A Family Separated Seeks Asylum in Chicago

 Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, right, and her sister Perla Flores Delgado, 3, play on scooters outside the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring their family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, right, and her sister Perla Flores Delgado, 3, play on scooters outside the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring their family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

 Maritza Flores sits with three of her children, from left, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores sits with three of her children, from left, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

 Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, sits on a balcony at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, sits on a balcony at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

 Perla Flores Delgado, 3, right, jumps on mattresses with Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Perla Flores Delgado, 3, right, jumps on mattresses with Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

 From left, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Anthony DeMay-Gres, 6, Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, retrieve scooters from the basement of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring the Flores family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

From left, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Anthony DeMay-Gres, 6, Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, retrieve scooters from the basement of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring the Flores family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

 A sign welcomes the members of the Flores family at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring them as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

A sign welcomes the members of the Flores family at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring them as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

 Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, left, looks at Liz Gres as she plays with Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, left, looks at Liz Gres as she plays with Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

 Perla Flores Delgado, 3, plays with a cat at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Perla Flores Delgado, 3, plays with a cat at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

 Maritza Flores, center, with her daughters Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, and Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, speak with Liz Gres, right, at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores, center, with her daughters Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, and Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, speak with Liz Gres, right, at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

 Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, left, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, get water from a fountain at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, left, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, get water from a fountain at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

 Maritza Flores pushes Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, on a swing at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores pushes Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, on a swing at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

 Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, spins on a swing at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, spins on a swing at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

 Sisters Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, and Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, do cartwheels at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Sisters Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, and Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, do cartwheels at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

 16-year-old Mariana Portillo Flores lays in the lap of her mother Maritza Flores at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

16-year-old Mariana Portillo Flores lays in the lap of her mother Maritza Flores at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores with three of her children, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, May 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Officials determined that her Flores' 18-year-old daughter, who made it across the border with the family, would have to make a solo plea for asylum because she’s an adult, and remains in an immigration detention center in San Diego. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. Flores said she is grateful for the family’s generosity, but she can’t get out of her mind her 18-year-old daughter languishing in a detention center.

Central American mother, children from migrant caravan seeking refuge in Chicago