Crawford rebuilds in his off-time

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford sits in the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford sits in the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford stands with the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford stands with the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford talks about the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford talks about the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A photo shows Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford with the "before" version of the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A photo shows Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford with the "before" version of the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford talks about the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford talks about the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford drives the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford drives the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS he restored with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford restored a 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS with help from his friends at Nortown Auto LLC, seen here in photos from Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in Chicago. He donated the car to the Chicago Blackhawks Foundation and fans can purchase raffle tickets at Blackhawks home games or online to enter the charity drawing for the car held February 18 2019.

Crawford practiced at MB Ice Arena on February 9, his first workout since suffering a concussion December 16 and a big step toward his quest to return to game action this season.

Take a ride with him: Corey Crawford's infatuation with cars has been building since he was a teen. His top speed? 'I don’t think I'm allowed to say.’

Beautiful Ice

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ice forms intricate patterns on the inside of the windows at the Garfield Park Conservatory on a freezing Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, in Chicago.

2019 NHL Winter Classic

Fans gather in the stands before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Fans gather in the stands before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks center Jonathan Toews (19) leaves the ice after the second period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks center Jonathan Toews (19) leaves the ice after the second period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The Boston Bruins warms up before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The Boston Bruins warms up before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Connor Murphy (5) shoves Boston Bruins right wing David Pastrnak (88) during the second period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Connor Murphy (5) shoves Boston Bruins right wing David Pastrnak (88) during the second period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The Pipes and Drums of the Chicago Police Department play as they lead the Chicago Blackhawks players to Notre Dame Stadium before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The Pipes and Drums of the Chicago Police Department play as they lead the Chicago Blackhawks players to Notre Dame Stadium before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks left wing Brendan Perlini (11) scores on Boston Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask (40) during the first period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks left wing Brendan Perlini (11) scores on Boston Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask (40) during the first period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Fans wait for the Chicago Blackhawks to arrive before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Fans wait for the Chicago Blackhawks to arrive before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks right wing Patrick Kane (88) tries for a breakaway goal during the first period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks right wing Patrick Kane (88) tries for a breakaway goal during the first period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The Boston Bruins celebrate a goal scored by Boston Bruins center Patrice Bergeron (37) during the second period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The Boston Bruins celebrate a goal scored by Boston Bruins center Patrice Bergeron (37) during the second period of the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

From left, Hayden, 14, Lucas, 13, Ariel, and Cameron Dela Cruz, 8, keep warm together before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

From left, Hayden, 14, Lucas, 13, Ariel, and Cameron Dela Cruz, 8, keep warm together before the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game between the Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith (2) greets Boston Bruins defenseman Zdeno Chara (33) as the teams shake hands after their loss to the Boston Bruins in the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. Boston won the game 4-2. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith (2) greets Boston Bruins defenseman Zdeno Chara (33) as the teams shake hands after their loss to the Boston Bruins in the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. Boston won the game 4-2. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks right wing Patrick Kane (88) and the Chicago Blackhawks leave the ice after their loss to the Boston Bruins in the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. Boston won the game 4-2. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks right wing Patrick Kane (88) and the Chicago Blackhawks leave the ice after their loss to the Boston Bruins in the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. Boston won the game 4-2. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A loss for the Chicago Blackhawks, but a perfect winter day for outdoor hockey at the 2019 NHL Winter Classic game between the Blackhawks and Boston Bruins Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. Always fun to photograph for a hockey fan like myself. Thanks for looking, and happy 2019!

Best of 2018

Junior Audrey Wright and others from North Lawndale College Prep High School stand in silence during a walkout in support of the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting and other victims of gun violence Wednesday, March 14, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Junior Audrey Wright and others from North Lawndale College Prep High School stand in silence during a walkout in support of the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting and other victims of gun violence Wednesday, March 14, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Rinaya Buick, 9, meditates during yoga class at the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Indigo Monae, who leads many of the yoga classes, often speaks of the importance of a "sense of self," something she teaches through meditation. "It's very meaningful, because if you don't have a sense of self, like, how are you going to love yourself? You know, if you don't know who are you, how do you know how to love yourself?" she said. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Rinaya Buick, 9, meditates during yoga class at the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Indigo Monae, who leads many of the yoga classes, often speaks of the importance of a "sense of self," something she teaches through meditation. "It's very meaningful, because if you don't have a sense of self, like, how are you going to love yourself? You know, if you don't know who are you, how do you know how to love yourself?" she said. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ihor Hulovatyy towels off after a chilly dip in Lake Michigan as the sun rises near Oak Street Beach Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018, in Chicago. Hulovatyy said he uses the water to "wake up" each morning, except if the waves are too high or there is snow and ice. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ihor Hulovatyy towels off after a chilly dip in Lake Michigan as the sun rises near Oak Street Beach Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018, in Chicago. Hulovatyy said he uses the water to "wake up" each morning, except if the waves are too high or there is snow and ice. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A boat moves through the water as the Chicago River is dyed green for St. Patrick's Day Saturday, March 17, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A boat moves through the water as the Chicago River is dyed green for St. Patrick's Day Saturday, March 17, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Buritt Bulloch cuts donuts out of dough Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Buritt Bulloch cuts donuts out of dough Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Former President Barack Obama speaks to Obama Foundation Fellows gathered at Stony Island Arts Bank Wednesday, May 17, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Former President Barack Obama speaks to Obama Foundation Fellows gathered at Stony Island Arts Bank Wednesday, May 17, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ronnita Miller appears as the earth-goddess Erda during a dress rehearsal of act three of Richard Wagner's opera "Siegfried," part of the Ring Cycle, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018, at the Lyric Opera of Chicago at Civic Opera House. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ronnita Miller appears as the earth-goddess Erda during a dress rehearsal of act three of Richard Wagner's opera "Siegfried," part of the Ring Cycle, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018, at the Lyric Opera of Chicago at Civic Opera House. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

17-year-old Maryori Urbina-Contreras is wrapped in an American flag as she stands with friends and family after being granted asylum by a judge at Chicago Immigration Court Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018, in Chicago. Maryori is one of 68,000 unaccompanied children who flooded across the southwest border of the United States, causing a humanitarian crisis in 2014. Fleeing gang violence in her home country of Honduras, Maryori travelled alone over 1,500 miles for several weeks in 2014 before reuniting with her mother Tania Contreras, who has been in the United States since 2001. In 2015, an immigration court judge postponed a final hearing for Maryori until today, when a Chicago Immigration Court judge granted her asylum. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

17-year-old Maryori Urbina-Contreras is wrapped in an American flag as she stands with friends and family after being granted asylum by a judge at Chicago Immigration Court Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018, in Chicago. Maryori is one of 68,000 unaccompanied children who flooded across the southwest border of the United States, causing a humanitarian crisis in 2014. Fleeing gang violence in her home country of Honduras, Maryori travelled alone over 1,500 miles for several weeks in 2014 before reuniting with her mother Tania Contreras, who has been in the United States since 2001. In 2015, an immigration court judge postponed a final hearing for Maryori until today, when a Chicago Immigration Court judge granted her asylum. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago White Sox center fielder Leury Garcia (28) gets hit by the ball while attempting a bunt during the seventh inning of the Chicago White Sox versus Tampa Bay Rays game Wednesday, April 11, 2018, at Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago. The White Sox won the game 2-1. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago White Sox center fielder Leury Garcia (28) gets hit by the ball while attempting a bunt during the seventh inning of the Chicago White Sox versus Tampa Bay Rays game Wednesday, April 11, 2018, at Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago. The White Sox won the game 2-1. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A jersey and rosary cover the casket of Stan Mikita during a public visitation for the Chicago Blackhawks legend, who died August 7 at the age of 78, Sunday, Aug. 12, 2018, in the atrium of the United Center in Chicago. Mikita played 21 seasons for the Blackhawks, winning the Stanley Cup in 1961 and, individually, the Hart, Art Ross and Lady Byng trophies numerous years. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A jersey and rosary cover the casket of Stan Mikita during a public visitation for the Chicago Blackhawks legend, who died August 7 at the age of 78, Sunday, Aug. 12, 2018, in the atrium of the United Center in Chicago. Mikita played 21 seasons for the Blackhawks, winning the Stanley Cup in 1961 and, individually, the Hart, Art Ross and Lady Byng trophies numerous years. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Bears linebacker Khalil Mack (52) high-fives fans after the Chicago Bears 48-10 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers game Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, at Soldier Field in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Bears linebacker Khalil Mack (52) high-fives fans after the Chicago Bears 48-10 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers game Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, at Soldier Field in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Anton Forsberg (31) makes a save against Minnesota Wild center Joel Eriksson Ek (14) during the second period of the Chicago Blackhawks versus Minnesota Wild Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018, at the United Center in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Anton Forsberg (31) makes a save against Minnesota Wild center Joel Eriksson Ek (14) during the second period of the Chicago Blackhawks versus Minnesota Wild Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018, at the United Center in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Florida Panthers' Vincent Trocheck poses for photos and video during the NHL Player Media Tour Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018, at the MB Ice Arena in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Florida Panthers' Vincent Trocheck poses for photos and video during the NHL Player Media Tour Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018, at the MB Ice Arena in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A woman hugs a wooden cross at the scene of a fire that killed at least 8 people, including 6 children, in the 2200 block of South Sacramento Avenue Sunday, Aug. 26, 2018, in the Little Village neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A woman hugs a wooden cross at the scene of a fire that killed at least 8 people, including 6 children, in the 2200 block of South Sacramento Avenue Sunday, Aug. 26, 2018, in the Little Village neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

People walk through the parking lot as they evacuate Mercy Hospital & Medical Center during an active shooter attack that left four people dead, including Chicago police Officer Samuel Jimenez, Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago. The shooter, Juan Lopez, 32, confronted emergency room doctor Tamara O’Neal, apparently over a “broken engagement,” killing her, 24-year-old first-year pharmacy resident Dayna Less, and Officer Jimenez, who responded to the shooting. Lopez was found inside dead the hospital, apparently suffering a wound to the head, but it was unclear how he was shot. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

People walk through the parking lot as they evacuate Mercy Hospital & Medical Center during an active shooter attack that left four people dead, including Chicago police Officer Samuel Jimenez, Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago. The shooter, Juan Lopez, 32, confronted emergency room doctor Tamara O’Neal, apparently over a “broken engagement,” killing her, 24-year-old first-year pharmacy resident Dayna Less, and Officer Jimenez, who responded to the shooting. Lopez was found inside dead the hospital, apparently suffering a wound to the head, but it was unclear how he was shot. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Intersex activist Pidgeon Pagonis poses for a portrait at their home Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018, in Chicago. Pagonis is calling for Lurie Children's Hospital to end the practice of controversial surgeries done on babies born with genitals that are part male and part female which they say are nonconsensual, unnecessary and sexually damaging. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Intersex activist Pidgeon Pagonis poses for a portrait at their home Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018, in Chicago. Pagonis is calling for Lurie Children's Hospital to end the practice of controversial surgeries done on babies born with genitals that are part male and part female which they say are nonconsensual, unnecessary and sexually damaging. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Friends and family comfort each other after the funeral for 26-year-old Jemel Roberson Saturday, Nov. 24, 2018, at House of Hope Church in Chicago. Roberson, an armed security guard at Manny’s Blue Room Lounge in Robbins, was trying to subdue a suspect in a bar shooting early November 11 when he was shot and killed by a Midlothian police officer who responded to the call. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Friends and family comfort each other after the funeral for 26-year-old Jemel Roberson Saturday, Nov. 24, 2018, at House of Hope Church in Chicago. Roberson, an armed security guard at Manny’s Blue Room Lounge in Robbins, was trying to subdue a suspect in a bar shooting early November 11 when he was shot and killed by a Midlothian police officer who responded to the call. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Yasmin Pena trims excess leaves from marijuana plants at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Yasmin Pena trims excess leaves from marijuana plants at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Nancy Toledo, 23, dances atop a trash can during London on da Track's set at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Nancy Toledo, 23, dances atop a trash can during London on da Track's set at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Poofy the 17-year-old cat hangs out with owner Sara Tait at Montrose Beach on a warm Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Poofy the 17-year-old cat hangs out with owner Sara Tait at Montrose Beach on a warm Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Spectators watch as the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds perform during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Spectators watch as the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds perform during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Melanie Perry looks at her phone as she undergoes her tri-weekly dialysis treatment, removing toxins from her blood, at DaVita Woodlawn Dialysis clinic Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Chicago. As a child, Perry developed Lupus, resulting in damage to her kidneys. After doctors recently said her eligibility for a transplant is running out due to complicated health issues, Perry created a Facebook post asking people to contact her transplant team if they are able and willing to donate a kidney, otherwise she may be on dialysis for the rest of her life. Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Melanie Perry looks at her phone as she undergoes her tri-weekly dialysis treatment, removing toxins from her blood, at DaVita Woodlawn Dialysis clinic Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Chicago. As a child, Perry developed Lupus, resulting in damage to her kidneys. After doctors recently said her eligibility for a transplant is running out due to complicated health issues, Perry created a Facebook post asking people to contact her transplant team if they are able and willing to donate a kidney, otherwise she may be on dialysis for the rest of her life. Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Tune-Yards' Merrill Garbus performs at Thalia Hall on March 3, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley / Chicago Tribune)

Tune-Yards' Merrill Garbus performs at Thalia Hall on March 3, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley / Chicago Tribune)

16-year-old Mariana Portillo Flores lays in the lap of her mother Maritza Flores at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

16-year-old Mariana Portillo Flores lays in the lap of her mother Maritza Flores at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Cordelia Dewdney poses for a portrait at her home Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, in the Edgewater Beach neighborhood of Chicago. Dewdney, of Lookingglass Theatre Company, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Cordelia Dewdney poses for a portrait at her home Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, in the Edgewater Beach neighborhood of Chicago. Dewdney, of Lookingglass Theatre Company, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Playwright Loy A. Webb sits for a portrait at the Den Theatre Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Chicago. She wrote "The Light," currently playing at the Den Theatre through February 25. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Playwright Loy A. Webb sits for a portrait at the Den Theatre Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Chicago. She wrote "The Light," currently playing at the Den Theatre through February 25. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Kish and Mike Carothers pick out a Christmas tree at Ivy's Christmas Trees Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018, in the Lake View neighborhood of Chicago. Ivy's, in its 29th year of business, sells only North Carolina Fraser Firs. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Kish and Mike Carothers pick out a Christmas tree at Ivy's Christmas Trees Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018, in the Lake View neighborhood of Chicago. Ivy's, in its 29th year of business, sells only North Carolina Fraser Firs. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks to supporters after he conceded his re-election bid to billionaire Democrat J.B. Pritzker on election night Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, at the Drake hotel in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks to supporters after he conceded his re-election bid to billionaire Democrat J.B. Pritzker on election night Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, at the Drake hotel in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Workers measure and photo signed petitions from mayoral candidate Bill Daley to file for candidacy Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, at the Chicago Board of Elections. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Workers measure and photo signed petitions from mayoral candidate Bill Daley to file for candidacy Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, at the Chicago Board of Elections. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Walter Reed holds his dog Barbie during a pet blessing service at All Saints Episcopal Church Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018, in the Ravenswood neighborhood of Chicago. Services were held as part of the celebration of the feast of Saint Francis of Assisi, who is often recognized as the patron saint of animals. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Walter Reed holds his dog Barbie during a pet blessing service at All Saints Episcopal Church Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018, in the Ravenswood neighborhood of Chicago. Services were held as part of the celebration of the feast of Saint Francis of Assisi, who is often recognized as the patron saint of animals. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Another crazy year in Chicago for me, covering the highs and lows. The highlight of 2018 was the story I did on the Yoga Gardens space in Lawndale, a place of refuge in a violent city neighborhood, a nice break from the usual overnight violence summer coverage.

Thanks for looking.

Click here for a gallery of the Chicago Tribune staff’s photos of the year.

John Wayne Gacy 40 years later

In these photographs, the horrors of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy are portrayed to remind people what his victims endured, and to highlight the six young boys who, 40 years later in 2018, remain unidentified. John Wayne Gacy sexually assaulted, tortured and murdered at least 33 teenage boys and young men in Cook County, Illinois between 1972 and 1978 and spent 14 years on death row before he was executed by lethal injection at Stateville Correctional Center in 1994. In 2010, the case was reopened by the Cook County Sheriff and previously unknown victims William Bundy and James Haakenson were identified by modern DNA testing and other evidence and the efforts of Detective sergeant Jason Moran: “The reason why this case is still on the minds of Chicagoans and throughout the country, is not just the amount of victims Gacy had, it's because Gacy had everybody fooled, and we don't like that feeling. He was a businessman, a local businessman, he worked in politics, being a ward committeeman. He dressed up as a clown and entertained children. He would have huge parties at his residence, where 200 people would come. They would go into the house to use the washroom and there was maybe 15, 16, 17, 18 victims buried in his crawlspace. He had everybody fooled in that way and people don't like that feeling. He wasn't the ghoul that most people would expect from a serial killer.” The blue nylon jacket belonging to Robert Piest, a victim of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy, is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

In these photographs, the horrors of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy are portrayed to remind people what his victims endured, and to highlight the six young boys who, 40 years later in 2018, remain unidentified. John Wayne Gacy sexually assaulted, tortured and murdered at least 33 teenage boys and young men in Cook County, Illinois between 1972 and 1978 and spent 14 years on death row before he was executed by lethal injection at Stateville Correctional Center in 1994. In 2010, the case was reopened by the Cook County Sheriff and previously unknown victims William Bundy and James Haakenson were identified by modern DNA testing and other evidence and the efforts of Detective sergeant Jason Moran: “The reason why this case is still on the minds of Chicagoans and throughout the country, is not just the amount of victims Gacy had, it's because Gacy had everybody fooled, and we don't like that feeling. He was a businessman, a local businessman, he worked in politics, being a ward committeeman. He dressed up as a clown and entertained children. He would have huge parties at his residence, where 200 people would come. They would go into the house to use the washroom and there was maybe 15, 16, 17, 18 victims buried in his crawlspace. He had everybody fooled in that way and people don't like that feeling. He wasn't the ghoul that most people would expect from a serial killer.” The blue nylon jacket belonging to Robert Piest, a victim of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy, is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Mugshots of John Wayne Gacy taken on Dec. 21, 1978, at the Des Plaines Police Department, are attached to a bulletin board at Cook County warehouse Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Mugshots of John Wayne Gacy taken on Dec. 21, 1978, at the Des Plaines Police Department, are attached to a bulletin board at Cook County warehouse Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A ligature recovered from one of the victims of serial killer John Wayne Gacy is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. Gacy sexually assaulted, tortured and murdered at least 33 teenage boys and young men in Cook County between 1972 and 1978 and spent 14 years on death row before he was executed by lethal injection at Stateville Correctional Center in 1994. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A ligature recovered from one of the victims of serial killer John Wayne Gacy is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. Gacy sexually assaulted, tortured and murdered at least 33 teenage boys and young men in Cook County between 1972 and 1978 and spent 14 years on death row before he was executed by lethal injection at Stateville Correctional Center in 1994. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A detail from a psychological consultation of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy from 1968, taken prior to any known murders, is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A detail from a psychological consultation of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy from 1968, taken prior to any known murders, is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Detective Sgt. Jason Moran of the Cook County Sheriff's Office stands in the room where evidence from the serial killer John Wayne Gacy murders is kept Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, at the Cook County Warehouse in Chicago. Since the case reopened in 2010, Moran has helped identify two previously unknown victims, William George Bundy and James Byron Haakenson. Of the 33 total murders, six still remain unidentified. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Detective Sgt. Jason Moran of the Cook County Sheriff's Office stands in the room where evidence from the serial killer John Wayne Gacy murders is kept Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, at the Cook County Warehouse in Chicago. Since the case reopened in 2010, Moran has helped identify two previously unknown victims, William George Bundy and James Byron Haakenson. Of the 33 total murders, six still remain unidentified. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A simple ring recovered from the left ring finger of an unidentified victim of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy is seen Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, at the Cook County Warehouse in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A simple ring recovered from the left ring finger of an unidentified victim of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy is seen Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, at the Cook County Warehouse in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A pair of handcuffs belonging to serial killer John Wayne Gacy is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A pair of handcuffs belonging to serial killer John Wayne Gacy is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A diagram drawn by the serial killer John Wayne Gacy of the location of the bodies in the crawl space of his home is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A diagram drawn by the serial killer John Wayne Gacy of the location of the bodies in the crawl space of his home is part of evidence from the 1980 murder trial of Gacy, stored at the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Records Storage and Digital Imaging Center Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, in Cicero, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Two vials of the blood of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy are seen in an evidence room Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, at the Cook County Warehouse in Chicago. Although Detective Sgt. Jason Moran of the Cook County Sheriff's Office and Sheriff Tom Dart do not believe there are any undiscovered victims of Gacy's, they had his DNA profiled from this blood and entered into modern databases just in case. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Two vials of the blood of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy are seen in an evidence room Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, at the Cook County Warehouse in Chicago. Although Detective Sgt. Jason Moran of the Cook County Sheriff's Office and Sheriff Tom Dart do not believe there are any undiscovered victims of Gacy's, they had his DNA profiled from this blood and entered into modern databases just in case. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The gravestone of James Byron Haakenson, a victim of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy, who was not identified until 2017, is seen Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, at Woodlawn Cemetery in Forest Park, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The gravestone of James Byron Haakenson, a victim of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy, who was not identified until 2017, is seen Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, at Woodlawn Cemetery in Forest Park, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

This was not an easy assignment.

How do you tell a story 40 years after it happened? And such a gruesome and horrifying one?

In these photographs, the horrors of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy are portrayed to remind people what his victims endured, and to highlight the six young boys who, 40 years later in 2018, remain unidentified. John Wayne Gacy sexually assaulted, tortured and murdered at least 33 teenage boys and young men in Cook County, Illinois between 1972 and 1978 and spent 14 years on death row before he was executed by lethal injection at Stateville Correctional Center in 1994. In 2010, the case was reopened by the Cook County Sheriff and previously unknown victims William Bundy and James Haakenson were identified by modern DNA testing and other evidence and the efforts of Detective sergeant Jason Moran: “The reason why this case is still on the minds of Chicagoans and throughout the country, is not just the amount of victims Gacy had, it's because Gacy had everybody fooled, and we don't like that feeling. He was a businessman, a local businessman, he worked in politics, being a ward committeeman. He dressed up as a clown and entertained children. He would have huge parties at his residence, where 200 people would come. They would go into the house to use the washroom and there was maybe 15, 16, 17, 18 victims buried in his crawlspace. He had everybody fooled in that way and people don't like that feeling. He wasn't the ghoul that most people would expect from a serial killer.”

A team of my extremely hard-working colleagues helped create this project, and you can see the whole thing over here: John Wayne Gacy was arrested 40 years ago in a killing spree that claimed 33 victims and shattered the illusion of the safe suburban community

Hot New Faces

Cordelia Dewdney poses for a portrait at her home Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, in the Edgewater Beach neighborhood of Chicago. Dewdney, of Lookingglass Theatre Company, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Cordelia Dewdney poses for a portrait at her home Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, in the Edgewater Beach neighborhood of Chicago. Dewdney, of Lookingglass Theatre Company, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Emily Fightmaster poses for a portrait at The Second City Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in Chicago. Fightmaster is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Emily Fightmaster poses for a portrait at The Second City Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in Chicago. Fightmaster is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Bridget Adams-King poses for a portrait on the set of "Haymarket" at Theater Wit Monday, Aug. 20, 2018, in Chicago. Adams-King, who plays Lucy Parsons in the production, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Bridget Adams-King poses for a portrait on the set of "Haymarket" at Theater Wit Monday, Aug. 20, 2018, in Chicago. Adams-King, who plays Lucy Parsons in the production, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Brianna Buckley poses for a portrait Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, at Jackalope Theatre in Chicago. Buckley, of Jackalope, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Brianna Buckley poses for a portrait Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, at Jackalope Theatre in Chicago. Buckley, of Jackalope, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Isa Arciniegas poses for a portrait at her home Monday, Aug. 13, 2018, in the North Center neighborhood of Chicago. Arciniegas, of the Goodman and Haven Theatres, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Isa Arciniegas poses for a portrait at her home Monday, Aug. 13, 2018, in the North Center neighborhood of Chicago. Arciniegas, of the Goodman and Haven Theatres, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Hannah Starr poses for a portrait at Victory Gardens Theater Monday, Aug. 13, 2018, in Chicago. Starr, of Victory Gardens, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Hannah Starr poses for a portrait at Victory Gardens Theater Monday, Aug. 13, 2018, in Chicago. Starr, of Victory Gardens, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Melody Angel poses for a portrait at the Goodman Theatre Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in Chicago. Angel, who was in "Father Comes Home from the Wars" at the Goodman, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Melody Angel poses for a portrait at the Goodman Theatre Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in Chicago. Angel, who was in "Father Comes Home from the Wars" at the Goodman, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jack Olin poses for a portrait at his home Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in the Edgewater Beach neighborhood of Chicago. Olin, of the Interrobang Theatre Project, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jack Olin poses for a portrait at his home Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in the Edgewater Beach neighborhood of Chicago. Olin, of the Interrobang Theatre Project, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Desiree Gonzalez poses for a portrait at Theatre Wit Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, in Chicago. Gonzalez, of Kokandy Productions, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Desiree Gonzalez poses for a portrait at Theatre Wit Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, in Chicago. Gonzalez, of Kokandy Productions, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Geno Walker poses for a portrait at his home Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago. Walker, of Timeline Theatre, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Geno Walker poses for a portrait at his home Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago. Walker, of Timeline Theatre, is one of the Chicago Tribune's Hot New Faces of Chicago Theater 2018. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Air and Water Show

Spectators watch as the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds perform during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Spectators watch as the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds perform during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Levon Moore, 3, sticks his fingers in his ears as the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds perform during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Levon Moore, 3, sticks his fingers in his ears as the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds perform during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds perform during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds perform during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Spectators watch as the AeroShell Aerobatic Team performs during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Spectators watch as the AeroShell Aerobatic Team performs during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A spectator watches through shades during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A spectator watches through shades during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The AeroShell Aerobatic Team performs during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The AeroShell Aerobatic Team performs during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A member of the U.S. Army Parachute Team Golden Knights carries a Red Line flag, representing the sacrifices of firefighters and first responders, as he descends during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. The flag was presented to Chicago Fire Department Deputy District Chief Ron Dorneker and members of the fire department Special Operations SCUBA team in honor of Juan Bucio, who lost his life while attempting a dive rescue in May, and all of Chicago's fallen firefighters and first responders. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A member of the U.S. Army Parachute Team Golden Knights carries a Red Line flag, representing the sacrifices of firefighters and first responders, as he descends during the Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago. The flag was presented to Chicago Fire Department Deputy District Chief Ron Dorneker and members of the fire department Special Operations SCUBA team in honor of Juan Bucio, who lost his life while attempting a dive rescue in May, and all of Chicago's fallen firefighters and first responders. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Thousands of people gathered to watch the 60th annual Chicago Air and Water Show at North Avenue Beach Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Chicago.

Marijuana in Illinois

Marijuana plants grow under lights at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Marijuana plants grow under lights at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Yasmin Pena trims excess leaves from marijuana plants at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Yasmin Pena trims excess leaves from marijuana plants at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Angie Moreland trims marijuana buds at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Angie Moreland trims marijuana buds at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Marijuana buds are trimmed at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Marijuana buds are trimmed at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Matt Rowbotham, left, and Margo Vesely wrap edible cannabis candies at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Matt Rowbotham, left, and Margo Vesely wrap edible cannabis candies at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Edible cannabis chocolates are ready to be wrapped at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Edible cannabis chocolates are ready to be wrapped at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Juan David Garcia measures portions of a cannabis product at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Juan David Garcia measures portions of a cannabis product at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ellen Anderson looks at a marijuana bud under a magnifying glass at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Ellen Anderson looks at a marijuana bud under a magnifying glass at Cresco Labs medical marijuana cultivation facility Wednesday, August 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A look at the rapidly expanding medical marijuana company Cresco Labs Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018, in Joliet, Ill. The company cultivates various strands of marijuana and also extracts compounds from the plants to create cannabis candies and other edibles, and cannabis oils, tinctures and other products for a variety of uses.

Link to Chicago Tribune story by Ally Marotti: Despite low demand, medical marijuana companies in Illinois are growing

Lollapalooza

Nancy Toledo, 23, dances atop a trash can during London on da Track's set at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Nancy Toledo, 23, dances atop a trash can during London on da Track's set at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Isaac Holman performs with his English band Slaves at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Isaac Holman performs with his English band Slaves at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago police officers stand by at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago police officers stand by at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A dancer performs with artist Khalid at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A dancer performs with artist Khalid at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Festival goers stand in front of large fans on a hot day four of Lollapalooza Sunday, August 5, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Festival goers stand in front of large fans on a hot day four of Lollapalooza Sunday, August 5, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

People spray festival goers with water during Herobust's set on a hot day four of Lollapalooza Sunday, August 5, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

People spray festival goers with water during Herobust's set on a hot day four of Lollapalooza Sunday, August 5, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Alex Kapranos of the Scottish band Franz Ferdinand performs at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Alex Kapranos of the Scottish band Franz Ferdinand performs at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Durand Jones & The Indications performs at Lollapalooza Sunday, August 5, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Durand Jones & The Indications performs at Lollapalooza Sunday, August 5, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Fans cheer as Khalid performs at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Fans cheer as Khalid performs at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Khalid performs at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Khalid performs at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A festival goer uses a handkerchief to keep dust out of her face at Lollapalooza Sunday, August 5, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A festival goer uses a handkerchief to keep dust out of her face at Lollapalooza Sunday, August 5, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Alex Turner performs with his English band Arctic Monkeys at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Alex Turner performs with his English band Arctic Monkeys at Lollapalooza Thursday, August 2, 2018, at Grant Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Slaves, Franz Ferdinand, Khalid, Arctic Monkeys, Durand Jones & the Indications, Knox Fortune and many more play in hot temperatures for fans at Lollapalooza 2018 in August in Grant Park, Chicago.

A Space for Peace

Rinaya Buick, 9, meditates during yoga class at the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Indigo Monae, who leads many of the yoga classes, often speaks of the importance of a "sense of self," something she teaches through meditation. "It's very meaningful, because if you don't have a sense of self, like, how are you going to love yourself? You know, if you don't know who are you, how do you know how to love yourself?" she said. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Rinaya Buick, 9, meditates during yoga class at the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Indigo Monae, who leads many of the yoga classes, often speaks of the importance of a "sense of self," something she teaches through meditation. "It's very meaningful, because if you don't have a sense of self, like, how are you going to love yourself? You know, if you don't know who are you, how do you know how to love yourself?" she said. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Indigo Monae leads a yoga class at the Yoga Gardens space Monday, July 2, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Monae is yoga teacher who saw a need for a safe and peaceful community space while she was living in a building next to an empty lot in Lawndale. Over the past 8 years, with help from other volunteers in the yoga community and funds from classes taught at Montrose Beach, Monae transformed the empty lot into a lush garden with a deck for yoga practice, drawing in young and old from the neighborhood. While living in Lawndale, she found access to healthy food options troublesome, and after witnessing young people involved in violence and drug dealing outside their home, she and her friends decided, "First of all, we need food, we need to teach them yoga, we need something to make them feel at peace," she said. "So that's how it began, just some yogis wanting to share some love." (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Indigo Monae leads a yoga class at the Yoga Gardens space Monday, July 2, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Monae is yoga teacher who saw a need for a safe and peaceful community space while she was living in a building next to an empty lot in Lawndale. Over the past 8 years, with help from other volunteers in the yoga community and funds from classes taught at Montrose Beach, Monae transformed the empty lot into a lush garden with a deck for yoga practice, drawing in young and old from the neighborhood. While living in Lawndale, she found access to healthy food options troublesome, and after witnessing young people involved in violence and drug dealing outside their home, she and her friends decided, "First of all, we need food, we need to teach them yoga, we need something to make them feel at peace," she said. "So that's how it began, just some yogis wanting to share some love." (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Indigo Monae works in the Yoga Gardens space Sunday, May 13, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Monae is yoga teacher who saw a need for a safe and peaceful community space while she was living in a building next to an empty lot in Lawndale. At first, the space was an empty field covered with rubbish without much vegetation. One morning while she was meditating on her porch, she said, "I saw this 10-year-old boy with a huge line of older people, like, down the alley. I was like, 'What's going on? What's going on?' And then I realized he was selling drugs to all these grown people. I was like, 'Whoa!' And it wasn't regular drugs, it was like heroin and things." Over the past 8 years, with help from other volunteers in the yoga community and funds from classes taught at Montrose Beach, Monae transformed the empty lot into a lush garden with a deck for yoga practice. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Indigo Monae works in the Yoga Gardens space Sunday, May 13, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Monae is yoga teacher who saw a need for a safe and peaceful community space while she was living in a building next to an empty lot in Lawndale. At first, the space was an empty field covered with rubbish without much vegetation. One morning while she was meditating on her porch, she said, "I saw this 10-year-old boy with a huge line of older people, like, down the alley. I was like, 'What's going on? What's going on?' And then I realized he was selling drugs to all these grown people. I was like, 'Whoa!' And it wasn't regular drugs, it was like heroin and things." Over the past 8 years, with help from other volunteers in the yoga community and funds from classes taught at Montrose Beach, Monae transformed the empty lot into a lush garden with a deck for yoga practice. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Rayzell Buick, 6, helps Indigo Monae water plants at the Yoga Gardens space Monday, July 2, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. "We plant the veggies, they see it grows, like, 'I created that with my hand and I can eat it,'" she said. "I remember when we first started the veggies and the growing, and I was eating, this kid was like, "Uhh! What you doing? Eating dirt?' I was like, 'No man, this is good!' And then all of a sudden, every time he come in here, he's like 'Oh, I like this!'" (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Rayzell Buick, 6, helps Indigo Monae water plants at the Yoga Gardens space Monday, July 2, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. "We plant the veggies, they see it grows, like, 'I created that with my hand and I can eat it,'" she said. "I remember when we first started the veggies and the growing, and I was eating, this kid was like, "Uhh! What you doing? Eating dirt?' I was like, 'No man, this is good!' And then all of a sudden, every time he come in here, he's like 'Oh, I like this!'" (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Peppers grown in the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Peppers grown in the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Rayzell Buick, 6, center, and Camaijah Duff, 6, draw on the fence at the entrance to the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Buick, who lives across the street, helps out founder Indigo Monae on an almost daily basis. "Like, some of their parents won't let them outside of the house," said Monae, because of some of the violence that often plagues Lawndale. "Can you image being 6 or 7 years old, you can't go out of the house, you're just in the house all day? They come in here and they just feel like, 'whoa.' They had a good day, they got move around, and their parents are ok with that because then they go to sleep. And then when the veggies grow, they leave here with veggies to give to their parents. So it's like, it's a nice place for them to come and relax." (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Rayzell Buick, 6, center, and Camaijah Duff, 6, draw on the fence at the entrance to the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Buick, who lives across the street, helps out founder Indigo Monae on an almost daily basis. "Like, some of their parents won't let them outside of the house," said Monae, because of some of the violence that often plagues Lawndale. "Can you image being 6 or 7 years old, you can't go out of the house, you're just in the house all day? They come in here and they just feel like, 'whoa.' They had a good day, they got move around, and their parents are ok with that because then they go to sleep. And then when the veggies grow, they leave here with veggies to give to their parents. So it's like, it's a nice place for them to come and relax." (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Volunteer Charlie Renison helps Rayzell Buick, 6, do a headstand during yoga class at the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Renison has been helping out in the gardens for five years. "The volunteers that come in here, they love it," said Indigo Monae, who has many friends in the Chicago yoga community who regularly help out. "Like, the kids love it, they want hugs, they remember them by name. That's why I like volunteers who can continuously come, because then like...a lot of people come into these kids' lives and they just disappear. So, a volunteer like Charlie who can be here for a few years, is really good, because then they develop a connection, they develop a love, they feel safe, and they can talk to us." (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Volunteer Charlie Renison helps Rayzell Buick, 6, do a headstand during yoga class at the Yoga Gardens space Wednesday, June 27, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Renison has been helping out in the gardens for five years. "The volunteers that come in here, they love it," said Indigo Monae, who has many friends in the Chicago yoga community who regularly help out. "Like, the kids love it, they want hugs, they remember them by name. That's why I like volunteers who can continuously come, because then like...a lot of people come into these kids' lives and they just disappear. So, a volunteer like Charlie who can be here for a few years, is really good, because then they develop a connection, they develop a love, they feel safe, and they can talk to us." (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Volunteer Trina Gerardi paints the face of Camaijah Duff, 6, during a community gathering event at the Yoga Gardens space Thursday, June 28, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Indigo Monae said she wanted to have an informal opening of the season for the gardens, because the space is not open every day and is closed during the winter. "So, the barbecue was a way to show the community like, 'Hey, we're here, we're still here, we're open, come in. This is for you.' And they enjoyed it. They loved it," she said. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Volunteer Trina Gerardi paints the face of Camaijah Duff, 6, during a community gathering event at the Yoga Gardens space Thursday, June 28, 2018, in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Indigo Monae said she wanted to have an informal opening of the season for the gardens, because the space is not open every day and is closed during the winter. "So, the barbecue was a way to show the community like, 'Hey, we're here, we're still here, we're open, come in. This is for you.' And they enjoyed it. They loved it," she said. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Indigo Monae is yoga teacher who saw a need for a safe and peaceful community space while she was living in a building next to an empty lot in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. Over the past 8 years, with help from other volunteers in the yoga community and funds from classes taught at Montrose Beach, Monae transformed the empty lot into a lush garden with a deck for yoga practice, drawing in young and old from the neighborhood. While living in Lawndale, she found access to healthy food options troublesome, and after witnessing young people involved in violence and drug dealing outside their home, she and her friends decided, “First of all, we need food, we need to teach them yoga, we need something to make them feel at peace,” she said. “So that’s how it began, just some yogis wanting to share some love.”

Link to Chicago Tribune story by Heidi Stevens: How a yoga garden nourishes the soul of a West Side block

A Family Separated Seeks Asylum in Chicago

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, right, and her sister Perla Flores Delgado, 3, play on scooters outside the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring their family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, right, and her sister Perla Flores Delgado, 3, play on scooters outside the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring their family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores sits with three of her children, from left, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores sits with three of her children, from left, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, sits on a balcony at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, sits on a balcony at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Perla Flores Delgado, 3, right, jumps on mattresses with Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Perla Flores Delgado, 3, right, jumps on mattresses with Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

From left, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Anthony DeMay-Gres, 6, Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, retrieve scooters from the basement of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring the Flores family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

From left, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Anthony DeMay-Gres, 6, Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, retrieve scooters from the basement of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring the Flores family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A sign welcomes the members of the Flores family at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring them as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A sign welcomes the members of the Flores family at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring them as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, left, looks at Liz Gres as she plays with Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, left, looks at Liz Gres as she plays with Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Perla Flores Delgado, 3, plays with a cat at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Perla Flores Delgado, 3, plays with a cat at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores, center, with her daughters Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, and Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, speak with Liz Gres, right, at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores, center, with her daughters Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, and Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, speak with Liz Gres, right, at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, left, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, get water from a fountain at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, left, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, get water from a fountain at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores pushes Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, on a swing at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores pushes Maggie DeMay-Gres, 4, on a swing at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, spins on a swing at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, spins on a swing at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Sisters Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, and Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, do cartwheels at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Sisters Perla Flores Delgado, 3, left, and Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, do cartwheels at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

16-year-old Mariana Portillo Flores lays in the lap of her mother Maritza Flores at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

16-year-old Mariana Portillo Flores lays in the lap of her mother Maritza Flores at Dunbar Park Wednesday, May 23, 2018, in Chicago. The Flores family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families, like the DeMay-Gres family in Chicago, to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Maritza Flores with three of her children, Skarleth Fernandez Flores, 6, Mariana Portillo Flores, 16, and Perla Flores Delgado, 3, at the home of the DeMay-Gres family, who is sponsoring her family as they seek asylum status in the United States, May 2018, in Chicago. The family left their home country of El Salvador years ago due to gang violence, living in Guatemala for awhile before ending up in Mexico. They crossed the border into the United States as part of a caravan of hundreds of people, organized by Pueblo Sin Frontreras, where they surrendered and sought asylum. Officials determined that Flores' 18-year-old daughter, who made it across the border with the family, would have to make a solo plea for asylum because she’s an adult, and remains in an immigration detention center in San Diego. Pueblo Sin Frontreras worked with Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of activists, to find sponsor families to house those in the caravan who did not have relatives in the United States. Flores said she is grateful for the family’s generosity, but she can’t get out of her mind her 18-year-old daughter languishing in a detention center.

Central American mother, children from migrant caravan seeking refuge in Chicago

C2E2

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Costumes and cosplay from Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2018, at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo at McCormick Place in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Old Fashioned Donuts

Buritt Bulloch cuts donuts out of dough Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Buritt Bulloch cuts donuts out of dough Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Uncooked donuts sit on a proving rack Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Uncooked donuts sit on a proving rack Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Lonnie Perkins fries up fresh donuts Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Lonnie Perkins fries up fresh donuts Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Drejauna Bulloch, granddaughter of Buritt Bulloch, takes an order over the phone Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Drejauna Bulloch, granddaughter of Buritt Bulloch, takes an order over the phone Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Lonnie Perkins glazes fresh donuts Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Lonnie Perkins glazes fresh donuts Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Drejauna Bulloch, granddaughter of Buritt Bulloch, takes orders Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Drejauna Bulloch, granddaughter of Buritt Bulloch, takes orders Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

A variety of donuts and other pastries are arranged in a box Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

A variety of donuts and other pastries are arranged in a box Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Buritt Bulloch cuts donuts out of dough Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Buritt Bulloch cuts donuts out of dough Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Owner Buritt Bulloch makes donuts, as he does every day, Tuesday, March 6, 2018, at Old Fashioned Donuts in the Roseland neighborhood of Chicago. He and his family, including his granddaughter, Drejauna, who works the counter, have been serving up donuts and other earthly delights on the South Side for over 45 years.

Loy Webb

Playwright Loy Webb sits for a portrait at the Den Theatre Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Chicago. She wrote "The Light," currently playing at the Den Theatre through February 25. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Playwright Loy Webb sits for a portrait at the Den Theatre Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Chicago. She wrote "The Light," currently playing at the Den Theatre through February 25. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Playwright Loy Webb sits for a portrait at the Den Theatre Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Chicago. She wrote "The Light," currently playing at the Den Theatre through February 25. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Playwright Loy Webb sits for a portrait at the Den Theatre Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Chicago. She wrote "The Light," currently playing at the Den Theatre through February 25. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Playwright Loy Webb sits for a portrait at the Den Theatre Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Chicago. She wrote "The Light," currently playing at the Den Theatre through February 25. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Playwright Loy Webb sits for a portrait at the Den Theatre Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Chicago. She wrote "The Light," currently playing at the Den Theatre through February 25. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Playwright Loy Webb sits for a portrait at the Den Theatre Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Chicago. She wrote "The Light," as described by The New Colony, "A surprise proposal takes an unexpected turn that upends the world of Genesis and Rashad, forcing them to confront a devastating secret from the past and putting the future of their relationship at risk. Featuring two of Chicago’s most dynamic actors, "The Light" is a 70-minute, real-time rollercoaster journey of laughter, romance and despair that uncovers how the power of radical love can be a healing beacon of light."

From the ashes of 'Birth of a Nation' controversy, a new playwright and 'The Light'

Best of 2017

Terron Sharp, left, and Cameron Dakota stand in the waters of Lake Michigan at North Avenue Beach at sunset Tuesday, July 18, 2017, in Chicago. "We came to the beach just to chill with each other. Play volleyball. And like, get wet, actually, because it was a hot day today. We're just chilling and having fun with each other. It's a nice beach," said Terron. The two said they are best friends and have known each other for a long time. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Terron Sharp, left, and Cameron Dakota stand in the waters of Lake Michigan at North Avenue Beach at sunset Tuesday, July 18, 2017, in Chicago. "We came to the beach just to chill with each other. Play volleyball. And like, get wet, actually, because it was a hot day today. We're just chilling and having fun with each other. It's a nice beach," said Terron. The two said they are best friends and have known each other for a long time. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Octopus tentacles decorate a front window of the Museum of Contemporary Art ahead of the opening of the Takashi Murakami exhibit, "The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg," Wednesday, May 31, 2017, in Chicago. The exhibit officially opens June 6 and runs through September 24. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Octopus tentacles decorate a front window of the Museum of Contemporary Art ahead of the opening of the Takashi Murakami exhibit, "The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg," Wednesday, May 31, 2017, in Chicago. The exhibit officially opens June 6 and runs through September 24. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The Haj Khalaf family, who came to Chicago as Syrian refugees, from left, Mohamad, 22, Aya, 19, Sham, 19 months, matriarch Fattoum Bakir, patriarch Khaled Khalaf, Baraa, 23, and Abdulmajeed sit together at their home Friday, April 14, 2017, in Skokie, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The Haj Khalaf family, who came to Chicago as Syrian refugees, from left, Mohamad, 22, Aya, 19, Sham, 19 months, matriarch Fattoum Bakir, patriarch Khaled Khalaf, Baraa, 23, and Abdulmajeed sit together at their home Friday, April 14, 2017, in Skokie, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

19-month-old Syrian refugee Sham Haj Khalad wears her grandfather's glasses at her home Friday, April 14, 2017, in Skokie, Ill. Fleeing the civil war in Syria, Sham's grandfather Khaled Haj Khalaf and his wife, Fattoum Bakir, came to Chicago in September 2016 with three of their children, but their oldest daughter Baraa Haj Khalaf and her family were denied entry in January of this year after President Donald Trump's immigration order banning all immigrants from Syria. Baraa, her husband Abdulmajeed and Sham spent two years in a Turkish refugee camp for the proper paperwork, interviews and background checks required to come to America. They were all finally reunited in February and now live together in the same apartment building. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

19-month-old Syrian refugee Sham Haj Khalad wears her grandfather's glasses at her home Friday, April 14, 2017, in Skokie, Ill. Fleeing the civil war in Syria, Sham's grandfather Khaled Haj Khalaf and his wife, Fattoum Bakir, came to Chicago in September 2016 with three of their children, but their oldest daughter Baraa Haj Khalaf and her family were denied entry in January of this year after President Donald Trump's immigration order banning all immigrants from Syria. Baraa, her husband Abdulmajeed and Sham spent two years in a Turkish refugee camp for the proper paperwork, interviews and background checks required to come to America. They were all finally reunited in February and now live together in the same apartment building. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Dia de los Muertos Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Dia de los Muertos Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Eddie Bolden was greeted by friends and family as he walked out of Cook County Jail a free man after spending 22 years in prison for a crime he did not commit Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in Chicago. A Cook County judge threw out murder convictions against Bolden, the fatal shooting of two men in 1994, and prosecutors declined to retry him. Bolden was 46 years old at the time of his release.  At his 1996 trial, a county jury convicted Bolden based on the testimony of Clifford Frazier, who was wounded in the shooting in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago. Frazier’s brother, Derrick, and another man were killed.  “When I stepped outside … there’s a difference between stepping out on a prison yard and seeing daylight and stepping outside outside. I still can’t explain it. It was like I stepped into a whole new world for real,” he said.  Private investigator Susan Carlson worked with Bolden and his family and found key alibi witnesses who had been overlooked at the original trial who ultimately led to his release.  Bolden spent the following year readjusting to life and reconnecting with his family and three children, Dominique, 23, Antonio, 25, and Bryana, 26. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Eddie Bolden was greeted by friends and family as he walked out of Cook County Jail a free man after spending 22 years in prison for a crime he did not commit Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in Chicago. A Cook County judge threw out murder convictions against Bolden, the fatal shooting of two men in 1994, and prosecutors declined to retry him. Bolden was 46 years old at the time of his release.

At his 1996 trial, a county jury convicted Bolden based on the testimony of Clifford Frazier, who was wounded in the shooting in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago. Frazier’s brother, Derrick, and another man were killed.

“When I stepped outside … there’s a difference between stepping out on a prison yard and seeing daylight and stepping outside outside. I still can’t explain it. It was like I stepped into a whole new world for real,” he said.

Private investigator Susan Carlson worked with Bolden and his family and found key alibi witnesses who had been overlooked at the original trial who ultimately led to his release.

Bolden spent the following year readjusting to life and reconnecting with his family and three children, Dominique, 23, Antonio, 25, and Bryana, 26. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The tomato tatin is made with carmelized onion, marinated buratta and warm tomato vinaigrette at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The tomato tatin is made with carmelized onion, marinated buratta and warm tomato vinaigrette at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive form of brain cancer that is now in remission and her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive form of brain cancer that is now in remission and her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Lorraine Szontagh draws around her grandson Marshall Szontagh, 3, with sidewalk chalk Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017, at her house in Elmwood Park, Ill. Marshall and his brother Jackson, 4, were poisoned by lead paint while their family lived in a three flat in Berwyn. Caitlin, the children's mother, said they have already developed some behavioral problems and learning disabilities but it may take years to find out the full extent of their injuries from the poisoning. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Lorraine Szontagh draws around her grandson Marshall Szontagh, 3, with sidewalk chalk Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017, at her house in Elmwood Park, Ill. Marshall and his brother Jackson, 4, were poisoned by lead paint while their family lived in a three flat in Berwyn. Caitlin, the children's mother, said they have already developed some behavioral problems and learning disabilities but it may take years to find out the full extent of their injuries from the poisoning. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Virginia Boyle cheers at a rally in support of transgender rights Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017, in the Boystown neighborhood of Chicago. The rally was organized to protest the move by the Trump administration to roll back federal protections for transgender students in public schools. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Virginia Boyle cheers at a rally in support of transgender rights Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017, in the Boystown neighborhood of Chicago. The rally was organized to protest the move by the Trump administration to roll back federal protections for transgender students in public schools. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Trent Reznor performs with his band Nine Inch Nails during Riot Fest Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, at Douglas Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Trent Reznor performs with his band Nine Inch Nails during Riot Fest Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, at Douglas Park in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

3-year-old Dayna Dorencz-Cuervo pushes herself in her wheelchair as she heads to her classroom at Barbara Vick Early Childhood and Family Center Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, in the Kennedy Park neighborhood of Chicago. Dayna has spina bifida and several other health issues which require special care. She usually gets around by crawling at home and uses a wheelchair when she goes to preschool. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

3-year-old Dayna Dorencz-Cuervo pushes herself in her wheelchair as she heads to her classroom at Barbara Vick Early Childhood and Family Center Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, in the Kennedy Park neighborhood of Chicago. Dayna has spina bifida and several other health issues which require special care. She usually gets around by crawling at home and uses a wheelchair when she goes to preschool. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

From left, Alison Richards, 13, Diedra Richards and Alex Richards, 10, sit on the ground as they struggle to play Pokemon Go at the Pokemon Go Fest Saturday, July 22, 2017, at Grant Park in Chicago. Many festival attendees had trouble getting the augmented-reality cellphone game to work. By the afternoon, Mike Quigley, chief marketing officer of the game's developer, Niantic, announced all ticket holders would receive refunds and be issued $100 in credits for use in the app. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

From left, Alison Richards, 13, Diedra Richards and Alex Richards, 10, sit on the ground as they struggle to play Pokemon Go at the Pokemon Go Fest Saturday, July 22, 2017, at Grant Park in Chicago. Many festival attendees had trouble getting the augmented-reality cellphone game to work. By the afternoon, Mike Quigley, chief marketing officer of the game's developer, Niantic, announced all ticket holders would receive refunds and be issued $100 in credits for use in the app. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Pittsburgh Steelers defensive end Cameron Heyward, center, and other players remain in the tunnel for the National Anthem before the game against the Chicago Bears Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, at Solider Field in Chicago. Bears players stood along their sideline, most of them with their arms interlocked in a show of unity. The entire Steelers team, with the exception of offensive tackle Alejandro Villanueva, remained in their locker room during the anthem. Villanueva, who served in the Army, stood near the northeast corner of the field with his hand over his heart. That was the response at Soldier Field to the firestorm that has swept through the sports world this weekend in the aftermath of sharp comments made by President Donald Trump, who blasted players who have chosen to engage in peaceful demonstration during the National Anthem. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Pittsburgh Steelers defensive end Cameron Heyward, center, and other players remain in the tunnel for the National Anthem before the game against the Chicago Bears Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, at Solider Field in Chicago. Bears players stood along their sideline, most of them with their arms interlocked in a show of unity. The entire Steelers team, with the exception of offensive tackle Alejandro Villanueva, remained in their locker room during the anthem. Villanueva, who served in the Army, stood near the northeast corner of the field with his hand over his heart. That was the response at Soldier Field to the firestorm that has swept through the sports world this weekend in the aftermath of sharp comments made by President Donald Trump, who blasted players who have chosen to engage in peaceful demonstration during the National Anthem. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Nashville Predators center Ryan Johansen, right, falls backward over Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Trevor van Riemsdyk, bottom, as he scores a fourth goal for the Predators on Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford during the third period of Game 2 of the Western Conference quarterfinals between game Saturday, April 15, 2017, at the United Center in Chicago. The Predators shut out the Blackhawks for the second time in a row 5-0 and ultimately swept the Chicago team in the best of seven series. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Nashville Predators center Ryan Johansen, right, falls backward over Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Trevor van Riemsdyk, bottom, as he scores a fourth goal for the Predators on Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford during the third period of Game 2 of the Western Conference quarterfinals between game Saturday, April 15, 2017, at the United Center in Chicago. The Predators shut out the Blackhawks for the second time in a row 5-0 and ultimately swept the Chicago team in the best of seven series. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Whitney Young Magnet High School forward Lucas Williamson gets a hug from his mother, Louiza Williamson, after his team defeated Simeon High School to win the Illinois State High School Basketball Class 4A Championship game 60-50 in overtime Saturday, March 18, 2017, at Carver Arena in Peoria, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Whitney Young Magnet High School forward Lucas Williamson gets a hug from his mother, Louiza Williamson, after his team defeated Simeon High School to win the Illinois State High School Basketball Class 4A Championship game 60-50 in overtime Saturday, March 18, 2017, at Carver Arena in Peoria, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Simeon High School forward Talen Horton-Tucker (5) covers his face after fouling out during overtime of the Whitney Young Magnet High School versus Simeon High School Class 4A Championship game Saturday, March 18, 2017, at Carver Arena in Peoria, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Simeon High School forward Talen Horton-Tucker (5) covers his face after fouling out during overtime of the Whitney Young Magnet High School versus Simeon High School Class 4A Championship game Saturday, March 18, 2017, at Carver Arena in Peoria, Ill. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Bears running back Tarik Cohen (29) catches a kick from the Green Bay Packers during the first quarter of the Chicago Bears versus Green Bay Packers game Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017, at Soldier Field in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Chicago Bears running back Tarik Cohen (29) catches a kick from the Green Bay Packers during the first quarter of the Chicago Bears versus Green Bay Packers game Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017, at Soldier Field in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Workers prepare the field before the Chicago Cubs versus Atlanta Braves game Sunday, Sept. 3, 2017, at Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Workers prepare the field before the Chicago Cubs versus Atlanta Braves game Sunday, Sept. 3, 2017, at Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Chicago Cubs right fielder Jason Heyward (22) leaves the field after the Cubs' 5-1 loss to the Atlanta Braves Sunday, Sept. 3, 2017, at Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Chicago Cubs right fielder Jason Heyward (22) leaves the field after the Cubs' 5-1 loss to the Atlanta Braves Sunday, Sept. 3, 2017, at Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Toronto FC midfielder Michael Bradley (4) fouls Chicago Fire forward David Accam (11) during the first half of the Chicago Fire match against Toronto FC Saturday, August 19, 2017, at Toyota Park in Bridgeview, Ill. The score was 1-0 Toronto at the end of the half. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Toronto FC midfielder Michael Bradley (4) fouls Chicago Fire forward David Accam (11) during the first half of the Chicago Fire match against Toronto FC Saturday, August 19, 2017, at Toyota Park in Bridgeview, Ill. The score was 1-0 Toronto at the end of the half. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Chicago Bulls guard David Nwaba (11) and Chicago Bulls guard Jerian Grant (2) celebrate their 104-102. win over the New York Knicks Saturday Dec. 9, 2017, at the United Center in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Chicago Bulls guard David Nwaba (11) and Chicago Bulls guard Jerian Grant (2) celebrate their 104-102. win over the New York Knicks Saturday Dec. 9, 2017, at the United Center in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

10-year-old Levi Krystosek waits in his doctor's office Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, at Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago. Levi is flown to Lurie's from Mississippi through the Miracle Flights organization for treatment of his very rare disease Jansen's metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. Severe JMC produces a dwarfing phenotype, or short stature, and other physical irregularities often include prominent or protruding eyes, wide cranial sutures and irregular formation of the long bones which can resemble rickets. Accumulation of calcium in the interstitum of the kidney is seen commonly as well. Dr. Craig Langman is a doctor at Lurie who specializes in treating some of these symptoms and has been seeing Levi since he was very young. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

10-year-old Levi Krystosek waits in his doctor's office Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, at Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago. Levi is flown to Lurie's from Mississippi through the Miracle Flights organization for treatment of his very rare disease Jansen's metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. Severe JMC produces a dwarfing phenotype, or short stature, and other physical irregularities often include prominent or protruding eyes, wide cranial sutures and irregular formation of the long bones which can resemble rickets. Accumulation of calcium in the interstitum of the kidney is seen commonly as well. Dr. Craig Langman is a doctor at Lurie who specializes in treating some of these symptoms and has been seeing Levi since he was very young. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A red-winged blackbird calls out near the Lincoln Park Zoo Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

A red-winged blackbird calls out near the Lincoln Park Zoo Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Pak Suan of Myanmar works in his small greenhouse in the Global Garden Refugee Training Farm Wednesday, May 24, 2017, in the Albany Park neighborhood of Chicago. About 100 families, including refugees from Bhutan, Myanmar and elsewhere, have plots in the community garden. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Pak Suan of Myanmar works in his small greenhouse in the Global Garden Refugee Training Farm Wednesday, May 24, 2017, in the Albany Park neighborhood of Chicago. About 100 families, including refugees from Bhutan, Myanmar and elsewhere, have plots in the community garden. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The mother of Kennatay Leavell kneels over his body outside a group of row houses in the 500 block of West Iowa Street Friday, July 28, 2017, in the Cabrini Green neighborhood of Chicago. The 31-year-old was shot multiple times in the face and died at the scene. Family members had been watching for an hour, held back from Leavell's then-uncovered body by police tape and officers, when his mother eventually found a way through one of the Cabrini Green apartments. "My baby," she cried as she struggled to hold him close to her. "My baby." (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The mother of Kennatay Leavell kneels over his body outside a group of row houses in the 500 block of West Iowa Street Friday, July 28, 2017, in the Cabrini Green neighborhood of Chicago. The 31-year-old was shot multiple times in the face and died at the scene. Family members had been watching for an hour, held back from Leavell's then-uncovered body by police tape and officers, when his mother eventually found a way through one of the Cabrini Green apartments. "My baby," she cried as she struggled to hold him close to her. "My baby." (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

A young girl stands in the doorway of an apartment near the scene of a fatal shooting in the 3700 block of West Fullerton Avenue Friday, Feb. 3, 2017, in the Logan Square neighborhood of Chicago. One 20-year-old man, the driver of a white vehicle stopped outside a cafe in the area, was shot in the hand and treated at Norwegian American Hospital while his co-worker and passenger, also in his 20s, was shot in the head and neck and died at the scene. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

A young girl stands in the doorway of an apartment near the scene of a fatal shooting in the 3700 block of West Fullerton Avenue Friday, Feb. 3, 2017, in the Logan Square neighborhood of Chicago. One 20-year-old man, the driver of a white vehicle stopped outside a cafe in the area, was shot in the hand and treated at Norwegian American Hospital while his co-worker and passenger, also in his 20s, was shot in the head and neck and died at the scene. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Rain falls on a car with police tape at the scene where 32-year-old Dario Balderrama was shot multiple times and killed in the 4800 block of South Racine Avenue Saturday, June 17, 2017, in the Back of Yards neighborhood of Chicago. About an hour later, two men and one woman were shot and taken to area hospitals less than a mile away on 44th Street. Both incidents involved rifles. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Rain falls on a car with police tape at the scene where 32-year-old Dario Balderrama was shot multiple times and killed in the 4800 block of South Racine Avenue Saturday, June 17, 2017, in the Back of Yards neighborhood of Chicago. About an hour later, two men and one woman were shot and taken to area hospitals less than a mile away on 44th Street. Both incidents involved rifles. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Three women hold each other as they sit on the ground at the scene of a fatal double shooting in the 5400 block of South Wabash Avenue Thursday, June 29, 2017, in the Washington Park neighborhood of Chicago. 32-year-old Jeanine Dowell and 41-year-old Juliet Washington were driving north when shots were fired from another vehicle, striking both women in the head. They were pronounced dead at the scene. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Three women hold each other as they sit on the ground at the scene of a fatal double shooting in the 5400 block of South Wabash Avenue Thursday, June 29, 2017, in the Washington Park neighborhood of Chicago. 32-year-old Jeanine Dowell and 41-year-old Juliet Washington were driving north when shots were fired from another vehicle, striking both women in the head. They were pronounced dead at the scene. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jose Moreno, left, 17, huddles together with other members of the John Overton High School of Nashville marching band as they wait in the cold for their turn to join the St. Patrick’s Day Parade Saturday, March 11, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jose Moreno, left, 17, huddles together with other members of the John Overton High School of Nashville marching band as they wait in the cold for their turn to join the St. Patrick’s Day Parade Saturday, March 11, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Actress Carrie Coon poses for a portrait at the Robey Hotel Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, in Chicago. Coon played Nora Durst on HBO's "The Leftovers," Margo Dunne, the sister of Ben Affleck's main character, Nick Dunne, in "Gone Girl" and most recently Gloria Burgle in FX's "Fargo" series in 2017. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Actress Carrie Coon poses for a portrait at the Robey Hotel Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, in Chicago. Coon played Nora Durst on HBO's "The Leftovers," Margo Dunne, the sister of Ben Affleck's main character, Nick Dunne, in "Gone Girl" and most recently Gloria Burgle in FX's "Fargo" series in 2017. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

2017. What a year. Full of ups and downs. A pretty good year for photography for me, but it was hard work and sometimes stressful: Publishing the year long story on Eddie Bolden, exonerated from prison after 22 years, covering overnight violence in Chicago again during the summer and fall, lots of sports (though the Cubs bowed out early)...and more.

A rough but promising year as a woman and "Enemy of the American People," aka, a journalist. I am lucky to have supportive editors and colleagues. I am thankful and proud to do what I do and will continue to tell the stories of people in my community and shed light on an unseen truth or two. The people I meet every day truly enrich my own life. 2018 looks bright.

Click here for a gallery of the Chicago Tribune photography staff's photos of the year.

Dia de los Muertos

Yesica Cruz, left, and Elyza Gonzalez. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Yesica Cruz, left, and Elyza Gonzalez. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Isabelle Navarro, left, and Joanna Romero. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Isabelle Navarro, left, and Joanna Romero. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Serena Iman, left, and Mike Atwell. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Serena Iman, left, and Mike Atwell. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Victorio Velasquez, left, and Seraph Iman . Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Victorio Velasquez, left, and Seraph Iman . Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Maria Centeno, left, and Samantha Romero. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Maria Centeno, left, and Samantha Romero. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Gabriel Perales, left, and Jade Amore. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Gabriel Perales, left, and Jade Amore. Dia de los Muertos at Dvorak Park Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Faces of Dia de los Muertos Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, at Dvorak Park in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago. 

Jamela Anthony

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, records herself dancing at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Jamela Anthony, 6, records herself dancing at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Tangela Watson holds a photo of her daughter Jamela Anthony, 6, on the day doctors declared her cancer in remission on June 21, at their home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Watson worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Tangela Watson holds a photo of her daughter Jamela Anthony, 6, on the day doctors declared her cancer in remission on June 21, at their home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Watson worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Tangela Watson shows photos to her daughter Jamela Anthony, 6, at their home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Watson worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Tangela Watson shows photos to her daughter Jamela Anthony, 6, at their home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Watson worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Jamela Anthony, 6, walks up the stairs to her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, walks up the stairs to her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, wears Hello Kitty shoes as she plays at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela Anthony, 6, walks up the stairs to her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, wears Hello Kitty shoes as she plays at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela Anthony, 6, walks up the stairs to her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays with two different phones at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays with two different phones at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, records herself at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, records herself at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays with two different phones at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays with two different phones at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

Jamela Anthony, 6, plays at her home Friday, July 7, 2017, in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission. Her family has relied on Medicaid to cover costs. Tangela Watson, Jamela’s mother, worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune)

The lovely and bright six-year-old Jamela Anthony borrowed reporter Lisa Schencker's iPhone and small tripod and was busy filming herself when I arrived to photograph her at home in Chicago. Jamela has undergone extensive treatment for an aggressive tumor on her spinal cord that is now in remission as of June 21. Jamela danced, jumped rope and took her mother's phone to flip through photos as she kept Lisa's phone on record. She pouted a little when I asked her to sit next to her mother on the couch for an interview. She wanted to set up my tripod and be behind the camera.

Jamela's family has relied on Medicaid to cover the extensive costs of 52 weeks of chemotherapy and six weeks of radiation required to treat her cancer. She spent most of the year as a five-year-old in the hospital and missed school while her mother, Tangela Watson, missed work to care for her daughter.  Watson worries about how the Medicaid program might change if the Senate's Obamacare replacement bill becomes law.

Click hear to watch a video of Jamela, including video clips she created on Lisa's phone, and read more about how potential cuts to Medicaid can affect children in Lisa's story:

Advocates worry GOP's health bill would cut Medicaid for low-income children: 'It's not good for kids'

Margeaux Brasserie

The tomato tatin is made with carmelized onion, marinated buratta and warm tomato vinaigrette at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The tomato tatin is made with carmelized onion, marinated buratta and warm tomato vinaigrette at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Left: Executive Chef Brent Balika poses for a portrait at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. Right: Le Vieux Corps is made with cognac, house-made rock and rye, Cocchi Americano rosa and "herbstura" at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Left: Executive Chef Brent Balika poses for a portrait at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. Right: Le Vieux Corps is made with cognac, house-made rock and rye, Cocchi Americano rosa and "herbstura" at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The dover sole a la meuniere is made with white asparagus, brown butter and lemon confit at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The dover sole a la meuniere is made with white asparagus, brown butter and lemon confit at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The bar area at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The bar area at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Left: The Green Hills of Africa cocktail is made with rum, Cocchi Americano rosa, lemon jasmine tea and grapefruit cordial, egg white and prosecco at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. Right: The Loveable Trixter cocktail is made with vodka, Aperol, raspberry, rhubarb, dry curacao, lemon, egg white and champagne at The Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

Left: The Green Hills of Africa cocktail is made with rum, Cocchi Americano rosa, lemon jasmine tea and grapefruit cordial, egg white and prosecco at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. Right: The Loveable Trixter cocktail is made with vodka, Aperol, raspberry, rhubarb, dry curacao, lemon, egg white and champagne at The Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The Vieux Carre cocktail is made with cognac, Rittenhouse Rye, sweet vermouth, Benedictine and bitters at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The Vieux Carre cocktail is made with cognac, Rittenhouse Rye, sweet vermouth, Benedictine and bitters at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The Valrhona chocolate grand macaron is made with fresh raspberry and milk chocolate cremeux at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

The Valrhona chocolate grand macaron is made with
fresh raspberry and milk chocolate cremeux at Margeaux Brasserie at the Waldorf Astoria Thursday, June 6, 2017, in Chicago. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune) 

A few photos from a fun shoot at the new French restaurant in the Waldorf Astoria hotel in downtown Chicago Margeaux Brasserie. Some nice-looking food and beautiful cocktails. 

Life, Outside

Chicago Tribune, Sunday, June 18, 2017.

Chicago Tribune, Sunday, June 18, 2017.

Eddie Bolden was greeted by friends and family as he walked out of Cook County Jail a free man after spending 22 years in prison for a crime he did not commit Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in Chicago. A Cook County judge threw out murder convictions against Bolden, the fatal shooting of two men in 1994, and prosecutors declined to retry him. Bolden was 46 years old at the time of his release.

At his 1996 trial, a county jury convicted Bolden based on the testimony of Clifford Frazier, who was wounded in the shooting in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago. Frazier’s brother, Derrick, and another man were killed.

“When I stepped outside … there’s a difference between stepping out on a prison yard and seeing daylight and stepping outside outside. I still can’t explain it. It was like I stepped into a whole new world for real,” he said.

Private investigator Susan Carlson worked with Bolden and his family and found key alibi witnesses who had been overlooked at the original trial who ultimately led to his release.

Bolden spent the last year readjusting to life and reconnecting with his family and three children, Dominique, 23, Antonio, 25, and Bryana, 26.

I had the privilege of spending the past year documenting some of this while getting to know Eddie and his family. Please click below for the full online version of this project, with story, photos and video:

A father — wrongly imprisoned for 22 years — reconnects with his children